Category Archives: philosophy and film

Twixt (2011)

“Twixt” is about dead-end roads and the distracted ambition of the travelers we find there in a makeshift world about middle grounds between dreams and the indecision of lost souls. We are invitees to the inky interiors of Coppola’s own perplexed life and the accumulated imaginings of his career. The result, while rewarding to Coppola aficionados and otherworldly adventurists, “Twixt” succeeds in ways and means that are simply not for everyone. Continue reading

Advertisements
Posted in Movie I've Seen, Movie Makers & Shakers, Movies You Should or Should Not See, My Review of Their Review:, On DVD, Online, philosophy and film, Rants & Raves | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Stand Up for Pain in the Oblivion of Pines

I watch so many movies I often get swept up in the effort to write about all of them in an effective and coherent way. Monday to Wednesday and I’m already behind, by Friday I’ll be right back here scrambling. This time I’m micro-reviewing, a handful of celluloid with the films Oblivion, Pain & Gain, Stand Up Guys and The Place Beyond The Pines. Continue reading

Posted in Blu-ray, Movie I've Seen, Movies You Should or Should Not See, My Review of Their Review:, On DVD, Online, philosophy and film, Rants & Raves | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Game of Thrones

Prepare yourself for smart and articulate tones, a broad and artful universe taken masterfully from an adaptation that respectfully brings the source material to the screen. Faithful to followers and enticing to regular theater goers, the producers aptly marry art with history for a particular kind of pop eccentricity, blurring ‘what might have happened’ with ‘what could have’, the best kind of speculative realism that enjoys hearty fiction almost equally. Continue reading

Posted in Essays on Film, Movie I've Seen, Movies You Should or Should Not See, My Review of Their Review:, On DVD, Online, philosophy and film, Rants & Raves | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Born on the Fourth of July (1989)

Oliver Stone’s films live and breathe in the aether of happenstance and catastrophe, hand-wrung spaghetti noodles on the wall of Americana in Technicolor pasticcio, washed in controversy and teeming causticity. Driven by Stone’s familiar and articulate camera, his branded editing techniques and his signature bravado that makes heroes of all his criminal souls, Born on the 4th is quite easily among his best films. Continue reading

Posted in Blu-ray, Essays on art, Essays on Film, Movie I've Seen, Movie Makers & Shakers, philosophy and film | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Is Measure the Foundation of the Beautiful?

Istoria serves as a starting point for this painting, a place to construct a landscape rich in the representation of figures and movements bestowed with grace, beauty, and propriety. I agree with the assertion that we cannot find a present-day verbal equivalent of the word Istoria, that in order to acquire meaning one must first immerse oneself in the work and the artist. With these transitory fragments we might then be capable of grasping by the eye that which exists in the verisimilitude of any great work of art. Continue reading

Posted in Essays on art, Online, philosophy and film | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments