The Art of the Work of Selling Your Art

The fact is we must all work at the art of selling our Art

The creative process is varied by medium and artist, inspiration as much as time, space and imagination but it does not end with the last paint brush stroke or pen and blue-black ink line shape.  It does not end with that last camera shutter snap or when the enter key clicks to save that .psd, .doc or .jpg filed, foldered, favored.  It does not end when it ends.  It is when the work is finished that work begins, the work of getting the work into the wind, beyond four-walled worlds to somewhere else all together new, online and in person – all art needs an audience otherwise it’s only really an object, a thing, a place of your defining.  All art is an object but not all objects are art, never mind beginnings and endings.  Audience gives art the size, shape and opportunity to go beyond identity of or by the artist, to thrive, the work, the work of the work to be sold in order for the artist to start all over again.

The creative process is varied by medium and artist but it does not begin until the art  finds identity, art through audience identified, art the object becoming the art object in order to be sold, the work of the work to see the art sold funds the artist to return to the drawing board, the work of the work of art is the art of the work to see the work sold.  This is the circle of life of art, art the work of the circle of art from imagination to something identifiable, a tangible identity, an object of art that becomes an art object, art shared and sold, an audience comes full fold, the creator must become the promoter, selling that which must be sold in order for the artist to survive, to grow old, to put art out into the world from the heart and for the soul.

If any work of art is ever really finished, the art of the hard work of selling your art begins, either by yourself or someone else to get your art from the void into the world.  Despite the idea of it, what some have you believe is true, that to create is to themselves enough and not for audience at all, their objects of art fail to become the art objects of shared experience, identifiable difference, the sameness that all artists seek to share their work with someone, sometimes for money, fame and fortune, always in order to get on with creation so the start begins, the process, the art making all over again, followed immediately, inevitably, necessarily the art of the work of selling your work.

Advertisements

About rorydean

Rory Dean is a multi-medium artist, writer and new media strategist with a background as a creative consultant and technology liaison in the San Francisco Bay Area. His broad experiences and specialties include print-to-web publicity, promotions and design marketing using traditional and social media networks. As a motion pictures and television professional, his short films, productions and commercials have screened to domestic and international audiences. His connections to a diverse client base include artists, entertainers, corporations, non-profits and everyday people.. Dean is co-owner and founder of Dissave Pictures, a boutique production company focusing on audio, video, photography and multi-media designs. Dean's personal and professional background includes dreaming and avid notebook journaling, creative and copy writing, promotions and marketing, audio/video production, photography, videography, editing, web design and new media. He’s also a fan of collaboration and knows when to turn the reigns over, offer feedback, lead the team and step aside. His portfolio includes print, online, film, video, photography, graphic design and promotions. He’ll show you. He has a book and everything. "When not juggling various online worlds, I do a pretty good mime – but that’s another story."
This entry was posted in Essays on art, Rants & Raves, Speak-Freely, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to The Art of the Work of Selling Your Art

  1. silver price says:

    Warhol and Oldenburg both used mundane objects as subjects for their artwork. The artist Roy Lichtenstein also selected an everyday object—a turkey—for subject of one of his works, but he represented it in a different way.

  2. simoncolumb says:

    You’ll chastise me for using such a famous example but it’s the most relevant: Van Gogh only sold one painting in his life-time.

    All the others existed and sat, somewhere, with not intrinsic value, and Van Gogh simply created time and time again to express himself – something that did not justify itself through financial gains.

    Personally, for me, anything created by man is a work of art. Whether it is any good or not is the crucial juncture – and this can be determined by the mother who is proud of her childs work and sticks it on the fridge; and it can be justified by the estimated cost exceeding $500,000. Either way.

  3. John says:

    If selling your work is (what we like or dislie) to the artist what art is to the purchaser, the audience, what does it say when the art dies with the artist never known never sold never given the quality of a price tag?

    • rorydean says:

      Hey John..The creative process is varied by medium and artist but it does not begin until the art finds identity, art through audience identified, art the object becoming the art object in order to be sold, the work of the work to see the art sold funds the artist to return to the drawing board, the work of the work of art is the art of the work to see the work sold. I think of it in terms of a cycle, keeping in mind the controversial “what is art” argument, and certainly if the art dies with the artist and is never qualified or quantified – well, how would anyone know what it was if it wasn’t hanging on a wall, in a frame, on a table top. Sure, it might be obvious but then we have to go back to https://rorydean.wordpress.com/2010/06/05/is-measure-the-foundation-of-the-beautiful/

  4. Pingback: Above the Line: End of the Year (2012) Wrap Up | Above the Line

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s